Monday, July 9, 2018

Type 2 Diabetes Complications

The major short-term complications associated with Type 2 diabetes include the following:
  • Hyperglycemia
  • Hypoglycemia
  • Ketoacidosis
  • Hyperosmolar Syndrome
As Type 2 diabetes progresses over the years, it rots outs the inside of your body, which eventually leads to one or more of the following long-term complications:
  • Kidney Disease (Dialysis)
  • Eye Disease (Blindness)
  • Nerve Disease (Amputation)
  • Heart Disease (Heart Attack, Stroke)
Other complications associated with Type 2 diabetes include the following:


  • High Blood Pressure
  • High Cholesterol
  • Obesity/Weight Gain
  • Periodontal Disease 
  • Frequent Infections
  • Bruises That Don’t Heal 
  • Sexual Dysfunction, e.g. erectile dysfunction
  • Depression
  • Chronic Fatigue & Adrenal Fatigue
  • Alzheimer's
  • Gout
  • Macular Degeneration


Type 2 Diabetes at Cell Level

As depicted in the cell diagram (below), the insulin receptors on the surface of each cell are damaged (inflamed).

These damaged receptors ignore the presence of insulin in your blood and prevent glucose from entering your cells via the glucose transporters  [1a].

Consequently, the glucose stays in the blood, causing your blood glucose level to rise [1b]. As a result, the cells can't produce energy or burn fat [2]

In addition, the cells are unable to remove toxins and waste [3]; and, over time, the cells may become further damaged and lose the ability to communicate with each other [4].


Type 2 Diabetes Pathology

Type 2 diabetes is a complex metabolic disease characterized by hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, cell inflammation, oxidation, and glycation.

These biological processes gradually cause serious damage to major tissues and organs including the arteries, eyes, kidneys, feet, heart and brain. 

The key stages of Type 2 diabetes pathology and pathogenesis include:
-- Hyperglycemia
-- Insulin Resistance
-- Oral Glucose Tolerance
-- Chronic Inflammation/Oxidation
-- Prediabetes
-- Full-blown Type 2 Diabetes
-- Diabetic Complications


Diabetes Diet Meal Recipes

Here are some examples of diabetic-friendly and macronutrient-balanced meals to help stabilize your blood glucose levels and reduce the inflammation and oxidation in your cells.

Super Breakfast
  • 1½ cups steamed broccoli (or 2 cups spinach)
  • Omega-3 organic egg or 3 oz. canned wild salmon
  • 1½ Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil/coconut oil
  • 16 oz. filtered/distilled water 
  • 6-8 oz. raw vegetable juice (optional)
Tip: If possible, drink the raw juice 30 minutes before your meal. 
Seasoning: Onions, garlic, sea salt, colored bell  peppers, other spices.
Optional: Add 1 scoop of super greens powder (e.g. chlorella/spirulina, wheat/barley grass) to a glass of water,

Super Snack
  • An apple (or other whole fruit)
  • A handful of walnuts/almonds
  • A glass of filtered/distilled water
  • Optional: Add 1-2 tsp. chlorella/spirulina to your water raw juice or low-sodium V-8 juice.
Super Lunch
  • A small salad (with Romaine lettuce, baby spinach, sprouts, onion, garlic, celery, cucumber, tomato, tuna, boiled egg, olive oil, apple cider vinegar)
  • A glass of filtered/distilled water
  • Optional: Add 1-2 tsp. chlorella/spirulina to your water
Super Dinner
  • 1 cup steamed Brussels sprouts and 2 cups steamed broccoli
  • 5 oz. baked skinless chicken breast or baked wild salmon
  • 2 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil/coconut oil
  • 12-16 oz. filtered/distilled water
  • 1 cup raw vegetable juice
  • Optional: Add 1-2 tsp. chlorella/spirulina to your water or juice
Note: Before you consider buying the author's Death to Diabetes book, try these meals for a couple weeks to see if they will help to lower your blood glucose.


Diabetes Diet Meal Plan Macronutrients

As part of my Diabetes Diet & Meal Plan, I developed this diagram to help diabetics who were frustrated with calorie counting and carb counting.

This meal plate can be used as a template or guide to design diabetic-friendly meals and develop diabetic recipes without having to count carbs and calories. 

Make sure that at least half the plate is full of green and bright-colored vegetables. Use a quarter of the plate for lean protein foods; and, the other quarter of the plate for legumes, lentils, or vegetables; or, some organic grains if you're going vegan.

The Key Macronutrients

Healthy Carbs include mono/poly-saccharides in the form of bright, colorful and green, leafy vegetables, some dark, colorful fruits, onions, garlic, other herbs & spices, legumes, medicinal mushrooms, and some specific organic whole grains (but, not wheat or any grains with gluten!).

Note: However, you should avoid all grains and cereals during the first 3 to 4 months of the program until your blood glucose has stabilized.

Examples of vegetables include spinach, broccoli, Brussel sprouts, kale, asparagus, cauliflower, celery, cucumbers, kelp, onions, garlic, lentils, okra, and bell peppers.

Examples of fruits include dark, bright colored fruits such as açai berries, blackberries, blueberries, cherries, cranberries, strawberries, apples, grapes, pears, kiwi, lemons, limes, and pomegranates.

Note: Eating mostly raw vegetables can accelerate your body's repair process and your body's ability to reverse your diabetes.

Lean Proteins include all the essential and non-essential amino acids in the form of nuts, seeds, cold-water fish (e.g. wild salmon, tuna), blue-green algae (chlorella, spirulina), fermented soy, organic dairy (e.g. organic, Omega-3, free-range eggs), lean animal meats (e.g. free-range chicken, turkey, organic beef); bone broth, gelatin; grass-fedorgan meats (beef liver, heart); wild animal meat (e.g. bison, ostrich, deer).

Note 1: If you are concerned about the mercury in fish, eat smaller fish like sardines or take a high quality Omega-3 supplement.

Note 2: Fermented foods such as sauerkraut, pickles, homemade yogurt, kombucha (fermented black tea), miso and tempeh (fermented soybeans) help to improve the intestinal flora balance, build the immune system, absorb more nutrients, and generate new nutrients including Omega-3 fatty acids, digestive aids and the trace mineral GTF chromium.

Note 3: If you plan to follow a vegan diet, you can still use our nutritional model -- just replace animal protein with non-animal protein; and, add more beans, lentils, nuts, seeds, vegetables, fruits, (some) organic whole grains, healthy fats, and other super foods to your meal plan. Also, add meat substitutes (e.g. veggie burgers, black bean burgers, meatless “chicken nuggets”, “beef” crumbles, etc.) and organic soy products (e.g. soy milk, edamame, soy nuts, tofu, tempeh).

Healthy Fats include various lipids in the form of plant oils and the unsaturated fats in nuts and seeds, avocados, and cold-water fish, e.g. extra virgin olive oil, extra virgin coconut oil, cod liver oil. But, you must avoid the clear vegetable oils and canola oil! 

Other healthy fats include grass-fed animal meats, raw grass-fed organic milk, raw grass-fed butter/ghee, raw grass-fed cheese, sour cream. 

Liquids include various beverages in the form of filtered or distilled water, raw vegetable juices; green tea, white tea; some raw fruit juices; and, a couple of the low-carb organic bottled juices, e.g. lemon, tomato, V-8, mangosteen.


Diabetes Meal Plan Macronutrients

As part of my Diabetes Diet & Meal Plan, I developed this diagram to help diabetics who were frustrated with calorie counting and carb counting.

This meal plate can be used as a template or guide to design diabetic-friendly meals and develop diabetic recipes without having to count carbs and calories. 

Make sure that at least half the plate is full of green and bright-colored vegetables. Use a quarter of the plate for lean protein foods; and, the other quarter of the plate for legumes, lentils, or vegetables; or, some organic grains if you're going vegan.

The Key Macronutrients

Healthy Carbs include mono/poly-saccharides in the form of bright, colorful and green, leafy vegetables, some dark, colorful fruits, onions, garlic, other herbs & spices, legumes, medicinal mushrooms, and some specific organic whole grains (but, not wheat or any grains with gluten!).

Note: However, you should avoid all grains and cereals during the first 3 to 4 months of the program until your blood glucose has stabilized.

Examples of vegetables include spinach, broccoli, Brussel sprouts, kale, asparagus, cauliflower, celery, cucumbers, kelp, onions, garlic, lentils, okra, and bell peppers.

Examples of fruits include dark, bright colored fruits such as açai berries, blackberries, blueberries, cherries, cranberries, strawberries, apples, grapes, pears, kiwi, lemons, limes, and pomegranates.

Note: Eating mostly raw vegetables can accelerate your body's repair process and your body's ability to reverse your diabetes.

Lean Proteins include all the essential and non-essential amino acids in the form of nuts, seeds, cold-water fish (e.g. wild salmon, tuna), blue-green algae (chlorella, spirulina), fermented soy, organic dairy (e.g. organic, Omega-3, free-range eggs), lean animal meats (e.g. free-range chicken, turkey, organic beef); bone broth, gelatin; grass-fedorgan meats (beef liver, heart); wild animal meat (e.g. bison, ostrich, deer).

Note 1: If you are concerned about the mercury in fish, eat smaller fish like sardines or take a high quality Omega-3 supplement.

Note 2: Fermented foods such as sauerkraut, pickles, homemade yogurt, kombucha (fermented black tea), miso and tempeh (fermented soybeans) help to improve the intestinal flora balance, build the immune system, absorb more nutrients, and generate new nutrients including Omega-3 fatty acids, digestive aids and the trace mineral GTF chromium.

Note 3: If you plan to follow a vegan diet, you can still use our nutritional model -- just replace animal protein with non-animal protein; and, add more beans, lentils, nuts, seeds, vegetables, fruits, (some) organic whole grains, healthy fats, and other super foods to your meal plan. Also, add meat substitutes (e.g. veggie burgers, black bean burgers, meatless “chicken nuggets”, “beef” crumbles, etc.) and organic soy products (e.g. soy milk, edamame, soy nuts, tofu, tempeh).

Healthy Fats include various lipids in the form of plant oils and the unsaturated fats in nuts and seeds, avocados, and cold-water fish, e.g. extra virgin olive oil, extra virgin coconut oil, cod liver oil. But, you must avoid the clear vegetable oils and canola oil! 

Other healthy fats include grass-fed animal meats, raw grass-fed organic milk, raw grass-fed butter/ghee, raw grass-fed cheese, sour cream. 

Liquids include various beverages in the form of filtered or distilled water, raw vegetable juices; green tea, white tea; some raw fruit juices; and, a couple of the low-carb organic bottled juices, e.g. lemon, tomato, V-8, mangosteen.


The 5 Dead Foods for Diabetics to Avoid

The 5 "dead" processed foods include:
  1. Refined flour, starches, grains 
  2. Refined sugar, fructose, sweets
  3. Trans fats, hydrogenated oils 
  4. Saturated fats (conventional)
  5. Drugs, medications 
Examples of these foods include:
-- Bread, pasta, rice, corn, potatoes 
-- Cakes, pies, candy, bottled fruit juices
-- Margarine, vegetable oils, canola oil, frozen dinners, packaged foods 
-- Fast foods, junk food, processed foods, fried chicken, hamburger
-- Prescription, OTC drugs, recreational drugs such as cocaine and heroin


Purpose of Blog

The primary purpose of this blog is to provide diabetes education and awareness about Type 2 diabetes in order to support effective Type 2 ...